Analyzing financial statements in Excel

A webinar for Executive MBA (EMBA) students by Chris Menard. Hosted by The University of Georgia Terry College of Business on 01/07/2020

Chris Menard

Hi, I'm Chris Menard and I'll be your instructor

This will be a 50-60 minute webinar, focusing on analyzing financial statements in Excel. We will approach topics such as 'overview of an income statement', vertical and horizontal analysis of an income statement, and also break-even analysis and more. See sections below for some related videos from my YouTube channel.

I'm a member of the Microsoft Creator team, and my public speaking client list includes The Georgia Society of CPAs for over 10 years, the Continuing Education Center for the University of Georgia since 2009, the Executive MBA students at the University of Georgia since 2010, and many others. In my spare time, when I’m not keeping up to date with the latest MS Office 365 features, I provide free support and create video tutorials on a variety of software. My YouTube channel is approaching 500 training videos and many of my training videos are on Microsoft's YouTube Channel.

 

01/07/2020 Webinar files and resources

Here are some videos related to this webinar that might help you

Horizontal or Trend Analysis in Excel

Horizontal analysis of financial statements involves comparison of a line item over two or more accounting periods. The period can be months, quarters, or years. This method of analysis is also known as trend analysis.

Watch on YouTube

Vertical Analysis of an Income Statement

A vertical analysis is used to show the relative sizes of the different accounts on a financial statement.

Watch on YouTube

The Rule of 72 demonstrated in Excel

The rule of 72 finds the number of years to double your money at a given interest rate. Doing the math in your head is easy. Take 72 and divide by the interest rate.

Watch on YouTube

Loan Amortization in Excel

Use Excel to create a loan amortization schedule. This is a table that shows each periodic payment on an amortizing loan (typically a mortgage or car loan).

Watch on YouTube